How ‘Tata’ Martino sees football

Playing spectacular football and valuing the importance of the players themselves are key aspects of the new Barça manager’s mind-set

(FC Barcelona)

(FC Barcelona)

Gerardo ‘Tata’ Martino has imposed a very specific style of football in Argentina and Paraguay, the only two countries where he has managed until now. Here we present a series of quotes from interviews in the South American press that give a good idea of his approach to the game:

Winning is an imperious need to ensure conviction, but the message needs to be coherent: we cannot play one game one way and then another in another” Perfil, May 26, 2012.

I go for possession, attacking, putting a lot of men in the opposing half, taking risks, making sure the defenders look back and for there to be forty metres between them and the keeper, for them not to stop playing the ball, when they have to move up, they move up, when they have to use the wings, they use the wings, and the ball shouldn’t be in the air unless there’s a reason…” Perfil, May 26, 2012.

The football player is the most important thing of all. Coaches are better or worse depending on the players we are in charge of. The coach is never above the people executing his orders (the players). People have made far too much a thing of the role of coaches” Fox Sports, April 15, 2012.

In youth football, we need to get back to working on skills” Fox Sports, April 15, 2012.

I was a skills-based player, I played well but ran little. Under Bielsa I learned that you need to do other things in order to play. It was a matter of survival” Fox Sports, April 15, 2012.

From a coach’s point of view, I’d say Argentinian football is among the most difficult and competitive in the world. From a spectator’s of view, I’d say I could only watch at most ten minutes of game of Argentinian football” La Nación, January 24, 2012.

Source: FC Barcelona

Also read a summary of “Barcelona Coach Martino’s ideology shaped by Old Boys network” by Jonathon Wilson

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